Chicago Linguistic Society 51 this week

A number of UCLA linguists (and alumni) will be presenting at this week’s 51st Meeting of the Chicago Linguistic Society.

Eleanor Glewwe: Tonal Assignment in English Loanwords in Mandarin Chinese

Margit Bowler: “Might be something”: Information protection in central Australia

Hannah Sarvasy: Monolingual fieldwork in and beyond the classroom: the Logooli experience at UCLA

Isabelle Charnavel (Ph.D. 2012, now at Harvard) and Christina Zlogar (Harvard): English Reflexive Logophors

Adam Jardine (Delaware) & Jeffrey Heinz (Ph.D. 2007, University of Delaware): Markedness constraints are negative: An autosegmental constraint definition language

Margit, Hannah and Eleanor even had some time try out the local eats!

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Keating gives colloquium at Michigan

Pat Keating was the UM Linguistics colloquium speaker on Oct. 3. Her talk, “Linguistic Voice Quality”, was based on joint work with a number of colleagues and former students who have participated in UCLA “Voice Science Consortium” projects.

(link: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/linguistics/events/colloquiumseries/ci.colloquiumpatriciakeatinguclalinguisticvoicequalityfri3oct2014_ci.detail)

Colloquium 01/18 – Jeffrey Lidz (Maryland)

Jeffrey Lidz (Maryland) will give a colloquium talk this Friday in Public Affairs 2270, at 11 a.m. As always, a social hour will follow at 1 pm in Campbell 2122. The title of the talk is:
Children’s Attitude Problems

Location: Public Affairs 2270 (Please note the change in location from last quarter)
Time: Friday, January 18, 11-1pm
Contact: Victoria Mateu

Please see her abstract below:

This talk will investigate the connection between children’s linguistic acquisition of mental state (‘attitude’) verbs and their mind-reading development. Children’s acquisition of attitude verbs like ‘think’ or ‘want’ has been used as a window into their understanding of other people’s minds. An extensive number of acquisition studies show that young children display difficulty with verbs like ‘think’ but not ‘want’. This result is often interpreted as reflecting an asymmetry in conceptual development: while the desire concept is acquired early, children fail to grasp the concept of belief until their fourth birthday. This talk presents a linguistic explanation for these acquisition facts, which derives the asymmetry and children’s mistakes from pragmatic factors, rather than a deficiency in semantic or conceptual knowledge. Our experimental results suggest that children’s conceptual and semantic knowledge for attitudes is in place early on, and can be unmasked in the right pragmatic conditions.

Colloquium: Friday 01/11, Karen Emmorey (SDSU)

Alumna Karen Emmorey (SDSU) will give a colloquium talk this Friday in Public Affairs 2270, at 11 a.m. As always, a social hour will follow at 1 pm in Campbell 2122. The title of the talk is: The Psycholinguistic and Neural Consequences of Bimodal Bilingualism

Location: Public Affairs 2270 (Please note the change in location from last quarter)
Time: Friday, January 11, 11-1pm
Contact: Pat Keating/Margaret Kroll/Margit Bowler

Please see her abstract below:

Bimodal bilinguals, fluent in a signed and a spoken language, exhibit a unique form of bilingualism because their two languages access distinct sensory-motor systems for comprehension and production. When a bilingual’s languages are both spoken, the two languages compete for articulation (only one language can be spoken at a time), and both languages are perceived by the same perceptual system: audition. Differences between unimodal and bimodal bilinguals have implications for how the brain might be organized to control, process, and represent two languages. In this talk, I highlight recent results that illustrate what bimodal bilinguals can tell us about language processing and about the functional neural organization for language.